cover story

Diversity matters

The Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument identifies five types of bargaining styles—competing, collaborative, compromising, avoiding, and accommodating—based on different personality types. Likewise, stakeholders could have different buying styles too; customize your communication strategy while negotiating with them.

Read More

Why do negotiations fail?

A cursory glance at any daily publication throws up news of umpteen ‘negotiations’ going on in the social, geopolitical, and business spheres. But not many lead to positive results for either player because often people plunge into it without exercising any degree of pragmatism. Poor ground work, abysmal levels of trust, and sometimes even ego stand in the way of engineering the best outcome.

Read More

People focus

“Emotions are an expression of how people are processing information, and can give a strong signal of how the mind is internalizing the discussion.” Managed well, they can turn a frustrating negotiation into one that is pleasant, productive, and even enjoyable.* Just as understanding the power of emotions, acknowledging the value of trust and adopting a win-win approach can go a long way towards ensuring valuable results.

Read More

Negotiations on the leadership path

According to conventional wisdom, leading people requires vision, charisma, and a palpable self-confidence—but not negotiation skills. Negotiation is for use outside the firm—for instance, in cutting deals with partners, customers, and suppliers. The conventional wisdom is dead wrong.* The skill to negotiate is integral, for without it the path to leadership would be difficult.

Read More

Mindful dialogue

Negotiation is inherent in any human interaction. For as long as we live, we are bound to interact with others exchanging mutual needs. We all negotiate… being able to negotiate in a state of awareness enables us to be flexible, open to novelty, creative with alternatives and free from the tyranny of thoughts and emotions. Mindfulness is a skill that, if cultivated and applied to negotiation, could lead to its effectiveness.*

True, mindfulness helps build within us a foundation of empathy and understanding, and takes us closer to the realization that win-win is not mere compromise.

Read More

Creative approach

In an article, ‘Six Guidelines for Getting to Yes’, Katie Shonk cites Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton: “Negotiators should look for negotiation strategies that can help both sides get more of what they want—by listening closely to each other, treating each other fairly, and jointly exploring options to increase value.”* In a negotiation, one has to explore both sides and identify limitless valuable solutions to succeed.

Read More

the impact of connection

“Communities are successful because their members are successful. For a community to thrive, it needs care and attention. This means building and growing a community is about people, not programs.”*

Read More

the effective leader

In an article in The Leadership Quarterly, Louis W Fry said, “People need someone and something to believe in. They need a spiritual leader who walks in front of them when they need someone to follow, someone who walks behind them when they need encouragement and someone to walk beside them when they need a friend. This is the kind of leader who understands that personal agendas must be put aside to foster the kind of spirit at work that creates a genuine sense of community.”1 This is the kind of leader who is effective and can empower people through the power of community.

Read More

the community rider

In her book, Power Your Tribe, Christine Comaford talks about creating a tribe, a community in an organization—a concept that has lost its significance in our hectic, individualistic world. She reiterates this concept to how teams become brilliant only together, no matter how turbulent the times are and what external changes are faced.

Read More

network perspective

“People [leaders] view networking as something that ‘is not them’ or that they could not see themselves doing. However, networking ability is crucial for getting things accomplished and making change inside organizations….”1 When managers take a network approach to leadership, they develop close communities of practice, which help the organization in achieving its strategic priorities.

Read More